TDD, Micro Steps, and Backing Up

TDD is a way to think through your requirements incrementally by writing a test for one small piece, writing just enough code to get that test to pass, refactoring, and then moving on to the next small piece.

As you’re growing your code in this way, you should be zoomed way in. Taking tiny, micro steps. The time from failing to passing test should be measured in seconds, not minutes. It’s a feedback loop and it should be tight. You don’t want to waste time poking around in the dark.

This puts excellent design pressure on your system. The only way to keep that tight feedback loop moving is by writing code that is loosely coupled with a single responsibility. Otherwise it will be too hard to test.

This is why TDD is more about design than it is about verifying working code. But that doesn’t mean you can ignore design completely and let your tests lead you blindly somewhere without thinking. You will need to zoom back out every once in a while. You will need to put your knowledge of good design principles into practice and think critically about your code beyond what’s only easy to test.

I’ve been in many positions where my tests painted me into a corner. Or my feedback loop starts slowing down as complexity starts spiking, or the easiest way to test something would result in an obvious code smell. When that happens, I back up.

The ability to back up is another reason to keep the feedback loop tight. You should always be able to easily jump back any number of steps to working code and try a new path.

Yes, you still have to choose your path when you TDD. It’s called test-driven development, but you’re still the driver, not the tests. They are a tool you use to drive out some desired behavior, and there’s usually going to be multiple ways to write tests to get there. Use your design sense to make the best choice. If you don’t like where you ended up, back up. And keep your feedback loop short so backing up is no big deal.

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