Does TDD slow you down?

When you first start out with TDD, development will be much harder and much slower. It will practically grind to a halt. This is because you are learning. I’m not as interested in this part of the discussion. Any time you are learning something new, you will go slower. The more interesting question is, is it worth learning? Does it still slow you down once you become competent?

The truth is, you may never be as fast with TDD as you were without it. That’s a sign that you were going too fast. You weren’t finishing your work. You were writing code to get that specific feature working, and then moving on. You didn’t have to worry if the code you wrote was tightly coupled or had a poor interface, because you only had to call it once and that work is done. You definitely didn’t do much refactoring, because there was no safety net in place to alleviate the fear.

That pace is super fast and very addicting. But it is not sustainable. You can get things built quickly, but eventually maintenance becomes a nightmare, and your progress grinds to a halt. That’s because the same qualities that make code hard to test make it hard to change. Building code is easy, maintaining (i.e. changing) code is the hard part. TDD forces you to start feeling that pain early, so the cost gets spread out over the life of the codebase, instead of pushed back and back until you’re forced to deal with it (technical debt!).

So it’s about trade-offs. If you are working on a quick prototype, don’t write tests. It will slow you down! It’s ok to admit that. But it’s fine, because tests for a prototype won’t provide value. But if you are building something to last, write tests. It may slow down your initial velocity, but it will even out over the long-term life of the project.

Have you been trying to do TDD and it still feels like it’s slowing you down too much? Does it seem like your tests are doing more harm than good? Are you still waiting to see all these supposed “benefits” of TDD? I’m working on some materials to help you level up your TDD skills so you can start loving your tests instead of hating them. And I started a newsletter so we can have a conversation about the pain you’re feeling, and I can let you know as soon my TDD materials become available.

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